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At home, in the office, in the sports club – many nerves each other with their aches. Does that bring anything, is it wholesome? What a health psychologist says

Psychology: Why do we like to talk about our illnesses?

At home, in the office, in the sports club – many nerves each other with their aches. Does that bring anything, is it wholesome? What a health psychologist says

Psychology: Why do we like to talk about our illnesses?
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  • Page 1 — Why do we like to talk about our illnesses?
  • Page 2 — "We prefer to support people who cannot do anything for ir illness"
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    Online Time: Those who depression or whom it hurts somewhere, usually share it with pleasure. Instead of immediately running to doctor, we tell our relatives, friends and colleagues about it. It always seems to be about health and illness – at home, in pub, in canteen, in office. Mrs Scholz, do we talk more often about our suffering than about or things?

    Urte Scholz: Yes. To my knowledge, re are no studies on this. But it is an everyday observation that I absolutely share.

    Urte Scholz is professor of applied social and health psychology at University of Zurich and conducts research on health behaviour and disease management. © Frank Brüderli

    Online Time: What is reason for this? What do we hope to complain about our suffering?

    Scholz: The most important reason seems to me that we are looking for support. On one hand, information and practical instructions. We ask, "Did you ever have such a strange tweets in your leg? What helped you? What doctor have you gone to? And did you take magnesium? " On or hand, we want comfort and understanding. So worries are reduced. We often seek someone who dissolves our inner tension for us by saying: You do not have to worry, or: go to doctor.

    Online Time: Our feelings make us experts in this field. Are we so glad to talk about our sufferings, because we are finally familiar with something?

    Scholz: I don't think we like to talk about our illnesses. Some people certainly talk a lot about it. Of course we are experts for our bodies. And if something is not as usual, we start thinking about it. For example, if I see a strange spot on skin or feel something that is no longer normal to me, it binds my attention. Then I have a strong need to talk about it because it is so present. Information that affects our bodies is very close to us. Even if y are associated with a certain degree of uncertainty. If I'm not sure if I have to worry about it and should actually be very urgent to doctor.

    Online Time: In most cases, however, we do not talk about diseases that are really dangerous, such as cancer or heart failure. Is it not necessarily a question of coping when we talk about diseases?

    Scholz: No, mostly we talk about things that are objectively less serious. But if I have a strange tingling in my foot, it can still be very worrying. Even if this looks ridiculous from outside, because it is only a aches.

    When we talk about intimate things like physical, we operate a kind of self-opening Urte Scholz, health psychologist

    Online Time: Some suffer with ir sufferings, with ir accidents and numerous surgeries. Are we proud of our sufferings?

    Scholz: Of course, re can be a search for recognition behind. Then narrative about an accident or illness is a means of getting attention and consideration. Those who have something, however, are also more likely to be exempt from tasks such as hated washing up in WG.

    Online Time: Doctors call this secondary disease gain.

    Scholz: Exactly. In end, someone will benefit from being ill.

    Online Time: What are reasons for constantly exchanging diseases?

    Scholz: When we talk about intimate things like physical, we operate a kind of self-opening. I'll tell you something I wouldn't say on a big stage. This creates closeness and intimacy that most people look for.

    Online Time: Do we like to talk about ourselves in core? and refore about our diseases?

    Scholz: You can't say that in general. Someone who is very extroverted, likes to talk and deal with ors and sometimes even of himself. And those who have a narcissistic coloured personality are more likely to talk about mselves.

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