Talk it out: How did you choose your neighborhood?

CLEVELAND, Ohio - Why did you choose your neighborhood? How do you define it? And why do you care? After all, a third of Americans say they've never interacted with their neighbors, according to the General Social Survey at the University of Chicago. But...

Talk it out: How did you choose your neighborhood?

CLEVELAND, Ohio - Why did you choose your neighborhood? How do you define it? And why do you care?

After all, a third of Americans say they've never interacted with their neighbors, according to the General Social Survey at the University of Chicago.

But people are particular about where exactly they live.

Do you live in Ohio City or Tremont? Is Hingetown actually a neighborhood?

"The important thing to remember in naming neighborhoods is that the name is useful in bringing neighbors together to work under a shared identity - an identity that allows the neighborhood to shine and be attractive to internal and external audiences," says the NeighborWorks America's Stable Communities initiative.

Shaker Heights touts its neighborhoods as "unique as our rows of historic homes. Each neighborhood is a mini-community with a distinctive vibe." 

Akron has redrawn its neighborhoods - and added two - in an effort to attract developers and new residents.

Akron works to enhance its neighborhoods

Each neighborhood has its own personality, and perks. It may boast a cute strip of shops, a communal park or historic homes.

Richard Florida, director of the Martin Prosperity Institute at the University of Toronto and Global Research Professor at New York University, wrote on CityLab that people make three big moves: when we embark on careers, when we have kids and when we retire. In each stage, we look for different amenities from our neighborhoods."

"Many young people may prefer big cities, with their vibrant job and dating markets and abundant amenities and things to do. Those with families prioritize bigger homes with better schools and more parks and green space. Ultimately, we look for the cities and neighborhoods that fit us best at the time. That said, most of us put the same things at the top of our lists: housing we can afford, being close to family and friends, and living not too far away from where we work. As much as our preferences may differ by who we are or the stage of life we're in, all of us--urbanites, suburbanites, and country-dwellers alike--tend to value the same basic things in the places we choose to live."

In this era of city planning, cities are working to attract residents with an emphasis on walkability, bikeability and shared public spaces. And their residents are passionate about where they live.

(You've seen the T-shirts, right?)

We want to know how you define your neighborhood, and why you care about it. So please join us for a conversation in the comments today from 10 a.m. to noon.

If you want to talk more about your town, please take our survey. It's fun, I promise.

Comments on this topic will be reviewed by a moderator before they are published.

In our Talk it Out pre-curated conversation, comments are published after they are reviewed -- promptly -- to ensure they adhere to our community rules, which prohibit indecent, hateful, abusive or harassing comments, personal attacks, vulgar nicknames, personal information including telephone numbers and addresses, email addresses belonging to others, anything inciting criminal behavior and copyrighted material for which you do not own the rights.

Comments that are not on the topic of this discussion will not be published.

Criticism is fine, as long as it is respectful. We seek a robust and courteous discussion.

Our editors found this article on this site using Google and regenerated it for our readers.

Yorum yapabilmek için üye girişi yapmanız gerekmektedir.

Üye değilseniz hemen üye olun veya giriş yapın.

NEXT NEWS